Amerigo: The Man Who Gave His Name to America Kindle


Amerigo: The Man Who Gave His Name to America [Epub] ➝ Amerigo: The Man Who Gave His Name to America By Felipe Fernández-Armesto – Natus-physiotherapy.co.uk In , European cartographers were struggling to redraw their maps of the world and to name the newly found lands of the Western Hemisphere The name they settled on America, after Amerigo Vespucci, an o In , European cartographers were Man Who Epub Þ struggling to redraw their maps of Amerigo: The MOBI :Ê the world and to name the newly found lands of the Western The Man Who PDF ☆ Hemisphere The name they settled on America, after Amerigo Vespucci, an obscure Florentine explorerIn Amerigo, the award winning scholar Felipe Fern ndez Armesto answers the question What s in a name by delivering a rousing flesh and blood narrative of the life and times of Amerigo Vespucci Here we meet Amerigo as he really was a sometime slaver and small time jewel trader a contemporary, confidant, and rival of Columbus an amateur sorcerer who attained fame and honor by dint of a series of disastrous failures and equally grand self reinventions Filled with well informed insights and amazing anecdotes, this magisterial and compulsively readable account sweeps readers from Medicean Florence to the Sevillian court of Ferdinand and Isabella, then across the Atlantic of Columbus to the brave New World where fortune favored the boldAmerigo Vespucci emerges from these pages as an irresistible avatar for the age of exploration and as a man of genuine achievement as a voyager and chronicler of discovery A product of the Florentine Renaissance, Amerigo in many ways was like his native Florence at the turn of the sixteenth century fast paced, flashy, competitive, acquisitive, and violent His ability to sell himself evident now,years later, as an entire hemisphere that he did not discover bears his name was legendary But as Fern ndez Armesto ably demonstrates, there was indeed some fire to go with all the smoke In addition to being a relentless salesman and possibly a ruthless appropriator of other people s efforts, Amerigo was foremost a person of unique abilities, courage, and cunning And now, in Amerigo, this mercurial and elusive figure finally has a biography to do full justice to both the man and his remarkable era A dazzling new biography an elegant tale Publishers Weekly starred review An outstanding historian of Atlantic exploration, Fern ndez Armesto delves into the oddities of cultural transmission that attached the name America to the continents discovered in the s Most know that it honors Amerigo Vespucci, whom the author introduces as an amazing Renaissance character independent of his name s fame and does Fern ndez Armesto ever deliver Bookliststarred review.


10 thoughts on “Amerigo: The Man Who Gave His Name to America

  1. Al Berry Al Berry says:

    Why should someone read about Amerigo, it might be to late for a reader who has made it this far the author writes near the end of the book Overall it is a mediocre book, not really due to the author but the subject material, Florentine Vespuccci was raised during the time of Lorenzo the magnificent and seems to have been from a cadet branch of the medicis Author evaluates the various claims of Vespucci and discusses a continent got named after him.


  2. Carl Rollyson Carl Rollyson says:

    Amerigo Vespucci, who gave his name to America, was a pimp in his youth and a magus in his maturity, writes Felipe Fern ndez Armesto His subject is reminiscent of Melville s confidence man, a figure of protean energy and inventiveness, a Florentine operator constantly on the make and adept at the makeover He is a startlingly contemporary personality, and so it is no wonder that the title of this biography puts us all on a first name basis with him.Part of a n er do well clan, Vespucci got hi Amerigo Vespucci, who gave his name to America, was a pimp in his youth and a magus in his maturity, writes Felipe Fern ndez Armesto His subject is reminiscent of Melville s confidence man, a figure of protean energy and inventiveness, a Florentine operator constantly on the make and adept at the makeover He is a startlingly contemporary personality, and so it is no wonder that the title of this biography puts us all on a first name basis with him.Part of a n er do well clan, Vespucci got his start working for the Medicis in Florence Although previous biographers have assumed his early profession as a procurer of women and jewels signaled his close connection with the Medicis, his most recent biographer is skeptical Lorenzo the Magnificent did not send his best boys to backwaters such as Seville Perhaps this is the moment to risk a speculation, Mr Fern ndez Armesto writes Amerigo himself may have taken the initiative, desperate to cut loose from a dependent family and make his fortune.Vespucci emerges in this witty biography as our hero, a picaresque merchant who goes broke backing Columbus s voyages and then decides to become an explorer himself, setting out in 1499 after hisfamous predecessor was generally acknowledged to have failed to make good on his promises No huge caches of gold, no pathway to Asia, no benign natives, and no paradisal climates.Amerigo s two voyages brought him no significant riches but rather a wealth of stories about exotic lands and a whole new continent So he wrote it all up Lots of it was hooey, but some of it was based on personal observation And Amerigo s reputation as a navigator, acquired through on the job training, grew He put his name on maps, starting with a Florentine publication in 1504 that would go through 23 printings, describing harrowing adventures and miraculous escapes.Other geographers, thrilled by Amerigo s accounts, published a huge map in 1507 with his name emblazoned on what is today Brazil Oops They soon realized that Vespucci had laid claim to too much But without CNN and the 24 hour news cycle, it was too late And so we all became Amerigonians.Mr Fern ndez Armesto obviously relishes his subject s prevarications and those gullible followers who made so much of a name In his retelling, history becomes a bit of a farce when it is not obscured by romantic illusions Even familiar concepts like the Renaissance get a drubbing Sounding like the Senator Ted Stevens of biography, Mr Fern ndez Armesto shouts It inaugurated modern times No Every generation has its own modernity, which grows out of the whole of the past It was revolutionary No Scholarship has detected half a dozen prior renaissances It was art for art s sake No It was manipulated by plutocrats and politicians.And there is muchto the list of no s in this iconoclastic, irreverent, but also superbly researched portrayal of a subject gifted at getting history to take him at his word.We live in a country named by mistake But to get the joke, you have to accept this biographer s shrewd research


  3. Todd Stockslager Todd Stockslager says:

    Vespucci will never be as well known as Columbus, but Fernandez Arnesto s portrait gives a face to the man who gave his name to America.This slim biography of Amerigo Vespucci makes the most of a maddeningly slim body of primary materials The author relies on contextual criticism and cultural and family resources to flesh out the story of a minor merchant of Florence who ends up in Seville in the service of the Spanish throne, much like his countryman Columbus But unlike Columbus, Vespucci was Vespucci will never be as well known as Columbus, but Fernandez Arnesto s portrait gives a face to the man who gave his name to America.This slim biography of Amerigo Vespucci makes the most of a maddeningly slim body of primary materials The author relies on contextual criticism and cultural and family resources to flesh out the story of a minor merchant of Florence who ends up in Seville in the service of the Spanish throne, much like his countryman Columbus But unlike Columbus, Vespucci wasn t a navigator He was basically a supplier of navigators, until he found himself on two or three, or four the sources conflict here cross Atlantic trips to the Novus Mundi which he reported to his adopted country in a slim volume of the same name attributed correctly the author concludes to Vespucci The assignment of the feminine Latin version of his name following the model of Africa, Asia, and Europa to the coast of the eastward jutting edge of the future Brazil was made by cartologist Waldseemuller on his famous map of 1507, based on the reading of Vespucci s reports and the incorrect conclusion that Vespucci preceded Columbus on the new continent The usage spread, so that by the time Waldseemuller discovered his mistake and reverted to the term Terra Incognita in 1513, it was too late to change the name that had spread from a corner of the southern continent to encompass the full continent both North and South.As Fernandez Arnesto argues, the naming may be for the best, given the negative historical freight associated with Columbus evangelism, imperialism, colonization, massacre and the relative obscurity of Vespucci which has enabled his name to be associated with the values of democracy, liberty, and opportunity associated with the United States of America that dominates the northern continent.Fernandez Arnesto concludes with an interesting question and the brief beginnings of an answer worthy of its own book length study why was it that Atlantic exploration was driven by citizens of the land locked Mediterranean Columbus and Vespucci the best known representatives in the service of the Atlantic facing nations


  4. Grumpus Grumpus says:

    I have always wanted to knowabout Amerigo Vespucci but have never stumbled upon anything until now I guess it was because April 25, 2007 was the 500th anniversary of the naming of America that this book was released.As there is surprisingly little documentation about Vespucci, the author attempted to paint the picture of his life by filling in the gaps with inferences based upon the sparse available facts All of this is portrayed in that light and nothing is meant to be misrepresented E I have always wanted to knowabout Amerigo Vespucci but have never stumbled upon anything until now I guess it was because April 25, 2007 was the 500th anniversary of the naming of America that this book was released.As there is surprisingly little documentation about Vespucci, the author attempted to paint the picture of his life by filling in the gaps with inferences based upon the sparse available facts All of this is portrayed in that light and nothing is meant to be misrepresented Even the picture on the cover of the book may not be of him as it too, cannot be confirmed.The actual naming of America was little influenced by Amerigo There is a convoluted story as to how the name was actually chosen but for trivia buffs it first appeared in a map in 1507 placed in the area of where Brazil is today The reason the cartographers gave for the using the name was that they were paying tribute to Vespucci by using a feminine version of his name to correspond to the feminine forms of Africa, Asia, and the Latin, Europa.Vespucci certainly was not the noble explorer I thought him to be Not the person I thought deserving of having our country named after Although I feel the naming honor should have gone to Columbus, the author makes a strong point by stating, Yet I doubt whether anyone nowadays thinks of Vespucci when they utter the name America It triggers no reminiscence of the man, precisely because he has been such an obscure, unknowable figure with a hidden, untold life How different the effects would be if Columbus s partisans had gotten their way and we spoke of, say, Christopheria instead Columbus has such an ineluctable presence in history that a hemisphere named after him would never be free of association with him. Overall Amerigo was an interesting character that I am glad to finally know better and as a result, a better understanding of his historical significance


  5. Madeline W Madeline W says:

    The writing itself isn t super compelling, but the research and measured interpretation are both very impressive, and give a great perspective on European s worldview in the early sixteenth century If your knowledge is still limited to In 1492, Columbus sailed the ocean blue, with the Nina, the Pinta, and the Santa Maria for the Castilian crown, you d better pick this one up.


  6. David David says:

    .actually, I had this book read to me while commuting to and from work There were some interesting items But, I know if I had to read actually read it and not listen to it being read , I would have never made it through the book.


  7. Jennifer Jennifer says:

    Too much longitude and latitude for my liking for a few interseting facts.


  8. Pearl Yusuf Pearl Yusuf says:

    I m not sure who wasarrogant Vespucci or the author No big suprises Dismiss.


  9. Ellen Ellen says:

    If you like 15th 16th century navigators, this book is for you I will admit to learning a thing or two, though mostly it was profoundly dull.


  10. A.K. Klemm A.K. Klemm says:

    I enjoyed reading this and will probably re read it in the future I think it lends itself best to an educational book club of sorts I read it to better understand the era I was teaching to my homeschooled daughter and would have loved to have read and discussed it as a group with other parents teachers I must also note it has the most beautiful table of contents layout typography I ve ever seen It s full of fun discussion topics, interesting source document references and quotes, and enjoya I enjoyed reading this and will probably re read it in the future I think it lends itself best to an educational book club of sorts I read it to better understand the era I was teaching to my homeschooled daughter and would have loved to have read and discussed it as a group with other parents teachers I must also note it has the most beautiful table of contents layout typography I ve ever seen It s full of fun discussion topics, interesting source document references and quotes, and enjoyable speculation of the times and cartography


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