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Cindie (Virago Modern Classics) [PDF / Epub] ★ Cindie (Virago Modern Classics) By Jean DeVanney – Natus-physiotherapy.co.uk In August Randolph Biddow s family join him on the sugar cane plantations of North Queensland For his wife Blanche it is an exile in the wilderness but for their maid Cindie, it is an exciting world In AugustRandolph Biddow s family join him on the sugar cane plantations of North Queensland For his wife Blanche it is an exile in the wilderness but for their maid Cindie, it is an exciting world of tropical forests, rewarding work and new relationships with white people, Pacific Islanders and Aborigines alike Teaching herself the sugar trade Cindie rises from servant to independent woman By the early s she is the indispensable manager of Biddow s expanded property but her complete happiness is marred by the jealousy and hatred of Blanche First published inthis is a compelling chronicle of plantation life and its challenges, of the racial tensions amongst workers and the politicking of landowners faced with the economic impact of the Commonwealth Bill But above all, this is the story of one determined and spirited woman.

  • Paperback
  • 332 pages
  • Cindie (Virago Modern Classics)
  • Jean DeVanney
  • English
  • 17 February 2019
  • 0140161538

About the Author: Jean DeVanney

Is a well known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Cindie Virago Modern Classics book, this is one of the most wanted Jean DeVanney author readers around the world.



10 thoughts on “Cindie (Virago Modern Classics)

  1. Pat Pat says:

    Cindie by Jean Devanny was published in 1949 towards the end of Devanny s prolific career of writing about labor issues in Australia She was, on and off, a member of the communist party which every now and then expelled her because while they supported her interest in social and labor issues they had a hard time coming to terms with her feminism This book was her last novel and was inspired by the Queensland cane cutters strikes in 1909 and 1911 and later At the start of the book Cindie has Cindie by Jean Devanny was published in 1949 towards the end of Devanny s prolific career of writing about labor issues in Australia She was, on and off, a member of the communist party which every now and then expelled her because while they supported her interest in social and labor issues they had a hard time coming to terms with her feminism This book was her last novel and was inspired by the Queensland cane cutters strikes in 1909 and 1911 and later At the start of the book Cindie has arrived as the servant of Blanche Biddow who is joining her husband, Randolph Biddow, formerly a secretary, in Masterman, Northern Queensland in 1896 where he is starting a sugar plantation funded in large part by Blanche Biddow s father Blanche comes from a wealthy middle class family and hopes that this endeavor will turn him into the successful man she believes she is entitled to have as a husband Despite being hosted and mentored by an established plantation owner, Barney Callaghan and his wife Mary, it is a big adjustment which Biddow is putting his heart and soul into managing while Blanche resists coming to terms with their new world Devanny is first and foremost a political writer who explores issues of feminism and class through the account of the gradual coming into her own of Cindie, who develops over ten years from submissive servant to successful grower, first of cane and then coffee Devanny s main focus, however, is on the gradual development of the White Australia Policy When the Biddows arrive in Queensland most of the manual work is being done by Kanakas, Melanesians brought as indentured workers not necessarily voluntarily, minimally paid and generally poorly treated They are, however, considered to be one step above the local Aborigines whom no one considers trainable or worth hiring Biddows treats his men well and Cindie goes out of her way to treat them as individuals to the horror of Blanche.Cindie s development into an independent and capable person, despite the barriers of gender and class, contrasts with Blanche s passivity and feelings of entitlement, and Blanche becomes jealous of her husband s respect for Cindie This leads to what I think is the weak part of the novel, its descent into what is almost soap opera at times with various romantic relationships somewhat grafted on to the historical subject matter The other weakness is Devanny s need from time to time to give the reader a detailed and rather preachy history lesson.The history of the period from 1896 to 1906 is interesting, the gradual movement to repatriate the Kanakas and the changes forced on plantation owners to persuade whites take the place of the Kanakas is fascinating, but a well written novel will show not tell Cindie s championing of the Aborigine s rightful role in the future of sugar growing is Devanny s ideal solution Biddow s support for Cindie is Devanny s idea of how gender relations should play out.I am very interested in Australian history so I found this to be a fascinating introduction to the period and the place and the interplay of racism and owner worker relations

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