The Strangest Family: The Private Lives of George III,


The Strangest Family: The Private Lives of George III, Queen Charlotte and the Hanoverians [Download] ➺ The Strangest Family: The Private Lives of George III, Queen Charlotte and the Hanoverians Author Janice Hadlow – Natus-physiotherapy.co.uk George III came to the throne in with a mission he wanted to be a new kind of king, one whose power was rooted in the affection and approval of his people The Strangest Family is the story of how the Family: The Kindle × George III came to the throne inwith a mission he wanted to be a new kind of king, one whose power was rooted in the affection and approval of his people The Strangest Family is the story of how the best intentions can The Strangest PDF/EPUB ² produce unhappy consequences.


10 thoughts on “The Strangest Family: The Private Lives of George III, Queen Charlotte and the Hanoverians

  1. Jeffrey Keeten Jeffrey Keeten says:

    I had always been interested in George III, that much misunderstood man, in whom apparently contradictory characteristics were so often combined good natured but obstinate, kind but severe, humane but unforgiving, stolid but with the occasional ability to deliver an unexpectedly sharp and penetrating insight George IIIThis all begins with Queen Anne dying without issue Due to the passage of the Act of Settlement in 1701, only a Protestant was qualified to ascend to the throne of Englan I had always been interested in George III, that much misunderstood man, in whom apparently contradictory characteristics were so often combined good natured but obstinate, kind but severe, humane but unforgiving, stolid but with the occasional ability to deliver an unexpectedly sharp and penetrating insight George IIIThis all begins with Queen Anne dying without issue Due to the passage of the Act of Settlement in 1701, only a Protestant was qualified to ascend to the throne of England This leaves the Stuarts out in the cold, even though the self styled James III, living in exile in Avignon, the son of the deposed Catholic king James II,considers himself the true king of England He is called the Jacobite Pretender, and this sets off a series of Scottish rebellions ending in the marshy fields at Culloden in 1746 when Bonnie Prince Charlie, James s son, leads his Scottish forces into the guns of the English with disastrous results The Stuarts cannot regain the throne through diplomatic means or through force, so that leaves us with the very German Protestant descendents of Anne, who are currently sitting on the throne of Hanover I ve never been pleased that the English felt their only option was to put VERY German aristocrats on the throne of England They didn t even speak English until George III They were in many ways anti English, insisting that none of their children could marry into English families In fact, they generally tried to find their children German husbands and wives I find them, as a descendent of Plantagenets, frankly, intolerable I understand the issues with putting a Catholic Stuart back on the throne, but seriously there had to be some English aristocrat with a royal bloodline who was Protestant George I, who really prefers to be in Hanover, is brought to England, and something else comes to light as to why the powers that be may have preferred a German king This is the era of the rise of the power of Parliament The Prime Minister is beginning to become the primary policy decision maker for the country George isn t quite a puppet or figurehead, but his powers are greatly reduced from the reign of Anne How would he know anyway The grumpy old bastard is too busy fighting with his heir, the future George II There is a long tradition in Hanover with kings viciously arguing with and spurning their heirs Obviously, none of them ever learned from how they were treated None really attempted to break this ridiculous cycle of familial loathing They became caricatures of the very people they used to despise, their fathers and grandfathers It s madness.I picked this book up because I didn t really know much about the Hanoverians My view of George III has always been colored by the Revolutionary War He was not regarded very kindly by the rebels in America He was always presented in my history classes as an oppressor and a crazed dunderhead I realized that most of my impressions of him were formed by his enemies Hardly fair, really I felt this book would maybe right the ship and leave me with abalanced view of George III I also wanted to see the Revolutionary War from his perspective Janice Hadlow started out writing this book withof an interest towards finding outabout the wives and families of the Hanovarian kings, and the book reflects this initial focus Some of this is very fascinating, but certainly did not change my feelings too much towards the cold personalities of these distant, German Centric kings They were capable of great kindness towards their families, but each story of kindness is offset by a story of narrow minded, controlling nastiness.The biggest disappointment of the book for me was that Hadlow spent very little time on the Revolutionary War It was over so quickly in her narrative that I assured myself she would return to this time period later in the book She did not George III and Queen Charlotte had fifteen kids, of which thirteen made it to adulthood The two that died were both boys, but that still left six male heirs to the British crown Two of those boys, George and William, became kings of England, but it was only Edward the Duke of Kent who managed to produce a legitimate heir to continue the royal line This diminutive young girl became the renown Queen Victoria, who would prove to be as fertile as her grandmother Charlotte George and Charlotte had tried their best to produce the perfect, deliriously happy family life They read books They brought in experts, but in the end they produced very unhappy children, and a lot of that had to do with the iron control that was exerted on their daily lives George, the heir, was kept in England, while his brothers were ordered to all corners of the world The girls were kept penned up in England and became near spinsters before their father would deign to try and find them husbands George, to further exert his control over his brood, had a law passed that his children could not marry without his consent Many of them fell in love with various subjects of the English crown, but as I stated before, he refused to allow any of his children to marry someone from the very country he represented This spawned clandestined, illegal marriages, illegitimate kids, and many tears and heartbreak.The grand experiment in creating the perfect family life was a dismal failure.I mentioned madness earlier I have always assumed that the infamous madness of KIng George III was overblown He was, after all, unlike his predecessors, an intelligent seeker of knowledge I tried, unsuccessfully, to appreciate the man for his finer qualities He was, if anything, marginally better At least he could speak English and was the first of the Hanoverians to be born in England George III was not just crazy He was batshit crazy He suffered from grand delusions and started to believe that he was married to an old flame rather than his wife of many decades When he was allowed access to his daughters, he fondled them and had to be restrained Needless to say, the man had no business being in charge of anythingcomplicated than his own bowel movements He fell into this madness numerous times and should have been deposed in favor of his son, but politics played a part Parliament knew, if George IV were officially crowned, that there would be a shakeup in government The son had favorites who were the political adversaries of the men in charge Parliament held off allowing the change, hoping that III would rally, and he did, only to fall back into madness numerous times Madness was allowed to run amuck.Hadlow tried to paint asympathetic view of the Hanovarians, but she didn t really move me to change my original impressions of them The best of them was the diminutive Victoria, who was really the first of the line to be a true English ruler, in my opinion I am also a bit fond of the hapless Bertie, who had to follow in his mother s footsteps, though perhaps a bit drunkenly To bury their German heritage, George V changed the family name to Windsor, a good move given the number of British lads who died in the trenches trying to stop the Boche in WWI We all, of course, like George VI who overcame a speech impediment to offer hope and comfort to a nation on the brink of catastrophic defeat during WW2 The royal Hanovarian family evolved into a symbol of what it means to be British English people like to proudly state that they have not been invaded since 1066, but I would assert that they were also invaded in 1714 when they opened their gates to the Hanoverians Even though I didn t get what I wanted from this book, I have to say the impeccable research done by Hadlow is impressive This will be considered the quintessential book on the family of George III If anyone has any suggestions on the best book to explore the Revolutionary War from the perspective of the British, do please share If you wish to seeof my most recent book and movie reviews, visit also have a Facebook blogger page at


  2. Jaylia3 Jaylia3 says:

    You d never know it from the way things turned out, but decades before his granddaughter Victoria was born George III had hoped to break the Hanover cycle of rampant family dysfunction to live a private life filled with affection, harmony, and virtue that would be a model for his people and prove British royalty worthy of the great tasks assigned to it by Providence George III s dream of a loving and prudent family fell apart long before madness claimed his mind, and ending up with a profligate You d never know it from the way things turned out, but decades before his granddaughter Victoria was born George III had hoped to break the Hanover cycle of rampant family dysfunction to live a private life filled with affection, harmony, and virtue that would be a model for his people and prove British royalty worthy of the great tasks assigned to it by Providence George III s dream of a loving and prudent family fell apart long before madness claimed his mind, and ending up with a profligate heir like Regency Prince turned King George IV is just part of the story While the focus is on George III, A Royal Experiment begins with the first Hanover king, George I, who was imported from Germany to keep the British royalty Protestant and who was unimaginably cruel to both his wife and his son George II, and the book ends with Queen Victoria, who in some ways was able to bring her grandfather s moral vision to life In addition to covering the personal lives of several generations of the royal family, the book is filled with thought provoking information about and reflections on the culture and attitudes of the time, including the differentiated roles of the sexes not a good time to be an intelligent independent woman and the changing views of marriage love or practical alliance equal partnership or male ruled household , family life, childhood coddled or challenged , madness, religion, childbirth practices female midwives or medically trained male doctors , and the duties and or rights of royalty.As an American it was fascinating to read about the various ways the American Revolution looked to and affected George III, British politicians, the general population of Britain, and the French Without being overly sensational, A Royal Experiment fully engaged my emotions as well as my mind it was horrifying to witness George III s descent into madness and heartbreaking to read about the early death of George IV s daughter Princess Charlotte, a high spirited young woman who self identified with Marianne of Jane Austen s Sense and Sensibility Thoroughly researched, well organized, accessibly written, and unrelentingly interesting


  3. Daisy Goodwin Daisy Goodwin says:

    The string of Georges in the eighteenth century have always seemed like a wedge of Germanic pumpernickel between the glamorous Stuarts and the tartan tinged domesticity of Queen Victoria But as Hadlow s enthralling book reveals, the psychodrama dancing from one generation to another is every bit as gripping as Henry VIII s marital dilemmas or Queen Victoria s tempestuous relationship with Albert The heart of the story is the attempt by George III to be a model family man as well as monarch He The string of Georges in the eighteenth century have always seemed like a wedge of Germanic pumpernickel between the glamorous Stuarts and the tartan tinged domesticity of Queen Victoria But as Hadlow s enthralling book reveals, the psychodrama dancing from one generation to another is every bit as gripping as Henry VIII s marital dilemmas or Queen Victoria s tempestuous relationship with Albert The heart of the story is the attempt by George III to be a model family man as well as monarch He doesn t have much in the way of role models the Georges were notoriously vile to their heirs, and were capable of great cruelty to their wives George is determined to break the pattern, and this book is a compelling account of how his noble experiment foundered What makes this book so compelling is Hadlow s novelistic eye for detail Charlotte was a German princess so poor that she had no spare dress to send to London as a pattern, with the result that all her wedding clothes were too big The fate of George s daughters was particularly poignant, one of them Sophia had an illegitimate child who she was forced to give up, while the sons gleefully ignored their father s uxoriousness But the real revelation of the book is Charlotte, an intelligent woman who must have longed for her husband to take a mistress as she struggled through fifteen pregnancies This book is long, but never boring A must read for anyone interested in royalty, the eighteenth century or the intricate warp and weft of family disfunction across the generations.Full disclosure Janice Hadlow is a friend, but I know lots of authors and I don t give them all five star reviews


  4. Louise Louise says:

    In this meticulously researched work, Janice Hadlow describes the family lives of the England s Hanoverian Kings, George I, II, III and IV As she sees it, George III made a concerted effort to break with the sordid, feuding and hate filled lives of his grandfather and great grandfather Hadlow poses that the ideals implanted by George III reached their fulfillment in what we have come to know as Victorian and that the standards he set for the British royal family have been a cornerstone in it In this meticulously researched work, Janice Hadlow describes the family lives of the England s Hanoverian Kings, George I, II, III and IV As she sees it, George III made a concerted effort to break with the sordid, feuding and hate filled lives of his grandfather and great grandfather Hadlow poses that the ideals implanted by George III reached their fulfillment in what we have come to know as Victorian and that the standards he set for the British royal family have been a cornerstone in its survival.The first third of the book sets the stage The reader sees how George I banished his wife for an affair while he had many Her cruelly enforced seclusion was complete she never saw or heard from her young children Their son, who grew to be George II, similarly experienced George I s cruelty and was also separated from his children As king, George II loathed son Frederick who tried to give his son, the future George III, a healthy childhood While Frederick died too young to see his son fully grown and married and too soon to accede to the throne the seeds of a new way were planted.While George s new style of family life did not have the anger of past generations, it was a stultifying mix of isolation and discipline As a result not one happy person is described in the book The Queen who bore 15 children was angry and bitter most of the time The King revealed deep depression in his mental illness periods The boys rebelled That they produced perhaps 50 grandchildren, but only 1 born in wedlock, was clearly an affront to the family values espoused by their father Only brief sketches are given of the boys rebellions The girls suffered the most and their sad lot is well defined.The girls were closely supervised and tightly controlled The queen says their tutors should balance their praise with uprightness Letters survive from Augusta the youngest and Royal the oldest that literally beg their tutor, Mary Hamilton, to love them p.269 70 In their teens and twenties, any hint of flirtation or romance is cruelly squelched The girls long to be married The author seems to feel that the Queen is enforcing the King s wishes p 605 , but when the King was incapacitated beyond recovery, The Queen fought not just against any marriage proposal but also attendance at various social engagements The Romanov Sisters The Lost Lives of the Daughters of Nicholas and Alexandra shows these similarly cloistered teen and younger girls to have the same sweetness, charity and wholesomeness ascribed to these British counterparts However, the British princesses letters belie the happiness and calm they project Few of the letters of the Romanov girls survive to draw their full portraits Were they to have survived would their lives and happiness have been similarly thwarted The author shows the impact on the family of losing the 13 American colonies the King is depressed and it cannot be mentioned , the French Revolution horror and the various issues facing Parliament It can be wordy in areas such as modern opinions on illness particularly the King s , descriptions of the novels family members read and assassination attempts to name a few.Janice Hanold is to be commended in bringing this all together It is recommended for those interested in this family and or the period


  5. Charity Charity says:

    I rather think one s response to this book depends entirely on what one expects to get out of it I expected aintimate portrayal of George III and instead found myself inundated with information not only about him, but his parents, grandparents, their marriages, his children and their romantic affairs, his wife, and various members of their households and larger court, including mentions of Georgiana, the Duchess of Devonshore, and others like her It talks about the immorality of court pr I rather think one s response to this book depends entirely on what one expects to get out of it I expected aintimate portrayal of George III and instead found myself inundated with information not only about him, but his parents, grandparents, their marriages, his children and their romantic affairs, his wife, and various members of their households and larger court, including mentions of Georgiana, the Duchess of Devonshore, and others like her It talks about the immorality of court preceding George s ascent to the throne, his determination to remain separate from his ancestors in marital fidelity, his choice in a wife, their many children, his eccentric habits and desire for solitude, his unusual behavior as regards children he was a playful, good natured father who crawled about on the floor with his brood, but as they got older took aauthoritarian tone with them all the most odd thing about him was his love of having daughters, in a male dominated society , and so on and so forth.For one who wants a comprehensive look at the court of the period, and some of itspopular and lesser known characters, this is a decent book It is not, however, an intimate biography of George III, since while the book revolves around him, one can read for pages and pages without running across any mention of him Evendisappointing, though, was the section regarding the Conflict with the American Colonies I looked forward to that section with anticipation, hoping that maybe it would shed some light on why such an honorable, good natured monarch would walk away from that conflict with such shame and a reputation for stubbornness Much to my surprise, the conflict is glossed over a few paragraphs and then we are onceon to politics on a larger sphere, dealing with his advisers and moving on to family portraits and such The most wisdom gleaned from that section was that George regarded the Colonies as unruly children who needed brought into hand, but there was so little about his actual involvement in the process that I am no wiser than when I started This trend continued into the later chapters I started skim reading shortly after this where a huge amount of attention is paid to the embarrassing details of his insanity but with no resolution at all, or even suggestion as to what might have been wrong with him I expected some sort of modern diagnosis, or at least addressing the various suggested illnesses that modern doctors have posed as reasonable suggestions for such a sever shift in his behavior With hardly any warning, George went from a faithful husband, always appropriate and proper, to a lecherous head case locked up in a straight jacket half the time, destroying his previously wonderful marriage in the process In the end, I did search online for related symptoms and illnesses and his increasingly frequent episodes hold up nicely against the manic phase of someone with a severe case of bipolar disorder George s life is a tragic one He is most remembered for his insanity and being the king that lost America, which is unfortunate, because underneath the stoic monarch beat the heart of a romantic, who adored his wife and children, who was faithful in a court fraught with immorality, who has the indignity of the entire world knowing about his worst moments and having no insight into his kinder ones This biography is a good read, if you want a generalized picture of the Georgian period and itsprominent characters at court, but it wasn t quite what I hoped it would be


  6. Caroline Caroline says:

    You would think a 700 page book on the private domestic life of a Georgian king I knew littleabout than the fact of his madness would be boring, or at the very least would flag through the mass of pages Not a bit of it I could hardly put this book down I came to feel real affection for all of the personalities in this tale or almost all of them it s hard to feel much sympathy or affection for the Prince Regent, later George IV and I was sorry to come to the end of it.Whilst George You would think a 700 page book on the private domestic life of a Georgian king I knew littleabout than the fact of his madness would be boring, or at the very least would flag through the mass of pages Not a bit of it I could hardly put this book down I came to feel real affection for all of the personalities in this tale or almost all of them it s hard to feel much sympathy or affection for the Prince Regent, later George IV and I was sorry to come to the end of it.Whilst George III s granddaughter Victoria is largely credited with the creation of the modern monarchy and the notion of the royal family at the heart of it, it was George III was really blazed that trail, determined to bring an end to the Hanoverian tradition of family discord, suspicion and hostility He was the first to really conceive of his royal role as one of duty and obligation, with the monarch as a role model and figurehead for his people, and this vision extended to his entire family.He was a kindly, benevolent father to his enormous brood of children, but his paternal virtues were best on display when the children were young He struggled with all of them, sons and daughters, when they grew older and developed wills and desires of their own he could not understand and would not tolerate any deviation from his vision of royalty with the family at the heart of it As a result his role as father and king degenerated into a form of emotional tyranny, keeping his daughters infantilised and dependent by refusing to allow them to marry, isolating and shunning his sons by his disapproval and rigidity None of George III s children could really have been said to lead happy, fulfilling lives.And yet George III is an immensely appealing figure, a simple, unassuming man who genuinely wanted those he loved to be happy, yet unable to see that his own actions to a certain extent perpetuated the Hanoverian legacy of family discord One could argue his madness was the least of the burdens he bequeathed to his family


  7. Stephanie Stephanie says:

    2016 Read Harder Challenge Read a book that s over 500 pages long.This is another book that could fit multiple challenge categories But those I feel confident about finishing, while who knows if I can finish another super long book this year And anyway, this book is just really really long In number of pages, but also in scope Huge cast of characters, over a hundred years of history, 30% of the e book is devoted to citing sources and you re still going to be reading for 600 pages all t 2016 Read Harder Challenge Read a book that s over 500 pages long.This is another book that could fit multiple challenge categories But those I feel confident about finishing, while who knows if I can finish another super long book this year And anyway, this book is just really really long In number of pages, but also in scope Huge cast of characters, over a hundred years of history, 30% of the e book is devoted to citing sources and you re still going to be reading for 600 pages all the same Anyway, wow, this book was one of the most pleasant reading surprises I ve had in a long time So informative, but also so engrossing and riveting and so surprisingly sad in places I knew absolutely nothing about George III s immediate predecessors, but they turned out to be fascinating in their own right By laying out all their dysfunction, the author also shows just how revolutionary George III was being when he made a conscious effort along the lines of yeah, I m not going to cheat on my wife, and I m not going to passionately hate my children By living this life and by living this life for a long, long time George III completely altered the tone of relations in the royal family from then on Not that he was perfect Far from it The author makes a good case that George was an absolute tyrant to his family For benign reasons, but still It starts from his decision making when selecting a wife One of his most important credentials was that she not challenge him ever Cue 17 year old Charlotte leaving Germany, arriving in England, and being ordered to not engage in politics and not have any real friends among her ladies in waiting Hadlow is clear that he showed Charlotte a great deal of affection until his madness ruined things between them, but you still have the rather terrible reality of a man stifling basically all of a woman s independence and free thought And Charlotte hated her lack of control, and wrote many letters to her brother that indicated having to suppress her emotions, and swallow all of her opinions Between this and 20 years of near continuous pregnancy she and George had 15 children Charlotte often had to bear the brunt of keeping up a functional, happy royal family In turn, Charlotte often took out a natural need for control on her children And what happened with their children is such a goddamn tragedy They were given some of the best and most progressive yes, really, progressive education in all of Europe The boys and girls alike However, their parents often practiced a mix of controlling behavior and chilly reserve when it came to their children Because George was away from them a lot of the time, Charlotte was often perceived as the reason for their boredom, when, in reality, she did almost nothing without George s say so With the exception of the heir, all the boys were sent far from home to work Whenever they came back, they were typically criticized for every way they d failed while abroad The girls were kept as permanent attendants to their mother, until they married And, out of 6 girls, only 3 of them married Only one of them married before menopause There are a lot of complex reasons for their parents failing to secure marriages for them, but it led to the same life for all of them Decades spent shut up with their mother, educated as hell, but rarely allowed any outlet for their energy No projects, no travel, nothing Now imagine this pressure cooker situation, and what happens when the patriarch who controls it all goes mad I ve really only touched on the surface of this book despite rambling for paragraphs But it s just a really compelling, well researched exploration of a turning point in history It s also a family drama in which people fuck up majorly by trying so hard to do the right thing After I finished I was left with a real sense of melancholy There s something unchanging about people, isn t there 99.9% of us won t be as privileged as the people studied in this work, but I think most of us have been caught up in family situations where people harm each other while being convinced they re doing right by each other Despite her subjects extraordinary life circumstances, Hadlow tapped into some universal characteristics in this work I came away a lotknowledgeable that I was about a whole century s worth of history, but I also came away reflecting on human nature in general


  8. Jeanette Jeanette says:

    What happened in America between 1775 and 1783 genuinely changed the world It also almost destroyed George III s kingship, and left him with a sense of failure from which he never fully recovered The crisis also struck a blow at George s carefully constructed vision of kingship, demonstrating the limitations of its effectiveness when faced with a direct confrontation His inability to deliver an outcome that he believed was both right and just instilled in him an anger and unhappiness as acuWhat happened in America between 1775 and 1783 genuinely changed the world It also almost destroyed George III s kingship, and left him with a sense of failure from which he never fully recovered The crisis also struck a blow at George s carefully constructed vision of kingship, demonstrating the limitations of its effectiveness when faced with a direct confrontation His inability to deliver an outcome that he believed was both right and just instilled in him an anger and unhappiness as acute as anything felt by his wife The sense of having failed in an endeavor which was central to his conception of himself as a man and a monarch was hard enough to bear but George s frustration was madeacute by the prolonged misery of the experience itself My motivation for picking up the book was, mostly, to gain a better understanding and knowledge of King George III and the era of the American Revolution But I didn t want the American point of view of things I ve got that available in spades What I wanted was to learnabout what was happening on the British side of events All we are ever really taught here is that George III was a tyrant and mad This book was fascinating and engrossing from the start I did need to keep a page marker on the family tree at first in order to refer back to it frequently but before long I had all the Georges, their wives, children and siblings sorted.I definitely gained the insight I was hoping for and then some.King George had very strong, guiding beliefs about how a royal family should live and behave He was trying to reform the idea of kingship during his reign His ideals and values, while sometimes resulted in good, to often imposed obligations and pressures on his family at too high a cost His daughters, I feel, suffered the most If anyone needs help distinguishing between the fairy tale life of a princess and the reality they need only read about King George s daughters Though his sons did not fare much better, they at least had a bitfreedom.Reading about King George s recurring bouts of illness and madness and the effect it had on his family, especially the queen, was rather saddening at times Janice Hadlow has the wonderful, and sometimes rare, ability to write a non fiction book of over 600 pages that never feels bogged down or boring


  9. Jess Jess says:

    Really, somewhere between 2 and 3 stars because a lot of it didn t hold my attention But the positioning of George III as the antecedent to Victoria and Albert s domestic bliss is FASCINATING And man, poor Queen Charlotte Poor princesses It s amazing the way that lives can get fucked up just from people trying to do what they think is right A very interesting read.


  10. Wisteria Leigh Wisteria Leigh says:

    Most American s have an opinion of King George III as the king who overtaxed the colonies, a stubborn and unreasonable tyrant If you believe that then, A Royal Experiment, by Janice Hadlow will intrigue you The American Revolutionary Era in American History stands out as one of my most favorite historical time periods I have read and studied the history of this era in post grad classes and it never fails to dominate my personal curiosity with an influence on my reading choices Whether non f Most American s have an opinion of King George III as the king who overtaxed the colonies, a stubborn and unreasonable tyrant If you believe that then, A Royal Experiment, by Janice Hadlow will intrigue you The American Revolutionary Era in American History stands out as one of my most favorite historical time periods I have read and studied the history of this era in post grad classes and it never fails to dominate my personal curiosity with an influence on my reading choices Whether non fiction history or historical fiction, I gravitate to this setting with un satiability I have read biographies, memoirs, primary documents, historical texts, articles and non fiction books that focus on the American side of the Atlantic However, this is the first book that I have read that takes place entirely on the other side of the ocean.From the moment I read about this book, I planned to fit it into my TBR book list I was then fortunate to receive a review copy by the publisher, Henry Holt and Company Janice Hadlow has written an account of King George III and his wife Queen Charlotte that is not about the American Revolution, but instead depicts the man in his less familiar role as father and husband Who would think King George had any wish to provide a stable and loving home He and Queen Charlotte had fifteen children Charlotte was first pregnant at age eighteen Remarkably, thirteen of their children survived infancy.The king was determined to show that his commitment to fidelity and family life were paramount in his life He planned to show his kingdom, a view far different from his ancestors It was important to him that the world see him as a devoted father and faithful husband as well as king It was to be, as Janice Hadlow so aptly titles her book, A Royal Experiment Hadlow s author s notes offered new insight for this reader I learned that Queen Charlotte, was a highly intelligent woman who resented her twenty plus years of pregnancy.She was a woman out of sync with her generation King George III believed the personal was always inextricably linked to the political pg xvi and his hope was that the public would want to mirror his private life I assumed that if his label as a tyrant in the colonies was genuine, it would carry over to his personal life No spoilers Janice Hadlow relied on countless 18th century letters, diaries and correspondence to gather the most honest and personal account of this royal monarchy The letters available by friends and family during the 18th century of her research are abundant I found it humorous that she discovered they were inclined to gossip and they loved to write One wonders what the 18th century Facebook would be like A Royal Experiment is a richly detailed book about King George III and Queen Charlotte Hadlow is able to provide a fascinating full dimension view of the American Colonist s former monarch A compelling and highly recommended history


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