The Last of the Wine PDF í of the Kindle Ñ The

The Last of the Wine [EPUB] ✷ The Last of the Wine ✼ Mary Renault – Natus-physiotherapy.co.uk In The Last of the Wine, two young Athenians, Alexias and Lysis, compete in the palaestra, journey to the Olympic games, fight in the wars against Sparta, and study under Socrates As their relationshi In The of the Kindle Ñ Last of the Wine, two young Athenians, Alexias and Lysis, compete in the palaestra, journey to The Last MOBI :Ê the Olympic games, fight in the wars against Sparta, and study under Socrates As their relationship develops, Renault expertly Last of the Epub à conveys Greek culture, showing the impact of this supreme philosopher whose influence spans epochs.


About the Author: Mary Renault

Mary Renault of the Kindle Ñ was an English writer best known for her historical novels set in Ancient Greece In addition The Last MOBI :Ê to vivid fictional portrayals of Theseus, Socrates, Plato and Alexander the Great, she wrote a non fiction biography of Last of the Epub à AlexanderHer historical novels are all set in ancient Greece They include a pair of novels about the mythological hero Theseus and a trilogy about the career of Alexander the Great In a sense, The Charioteer , the story of two young gay servicemen in the s who try to model their relationship on the ideals expressed in Plato s Phaedrus and Symposium, is a warm up for Renault s historical novels By turning away from the th century and focusing on stories about male lovers in the warrior societies of ancient Greece, Renault no longer had to deal with homosexuality and anti gay prejudice as social problems Instead she was free to focus on larger ethical and philosophical concerns, while examining the nature of love and leadership The Charioteer could not be published in the US until , after the success of The Last of the Wine proved that American readers and critics would accept a serious gay love story.



10 thoughts on “The Last of the Wine

  1. Pauline Montagna Pauline Montagna says:

    I cannot remember how I discovered Mary Renault s novels, but most likely at my local library which I haunted Although I read them all as a teenager, many years ago, their beauty and humanity are still a strong influence While The King Must Die and the Alexandrian books may have had a stronger impact, it is the delicacy of the relationship between the young lovers portrayed in The Last of the Wine that remains with me Because of her empathetic portrayal of love between men, many of Mary Renau I cannot remember how I discovered Mary Renault s novels, but most likely at my local library which I haunted Although I read them all as a teenager, many years ago, their beauty and humanity are still a strong influence While The King Must Die and the Alexandrian books may have had a stronger impact, it is the delicacy of the relationship between the young lovers portrayed in The Last of the Wine that remains with me Because of her empathetic portrayal of love between men, many of Mary Renault s fans, including myself, suspected the author was actually a man But her empathy goes even further Even classicists have found her depiction of the physical and spiritual ambiance of Ancient Greece so accurate as to be uncanny.It says a lot about a book that you feel a terrible sadness as you approach the final pages It was a sense of loss not only of the characters but for the characters, for The Last of the Wine is a novel about loss, not only of youth and love, but of something muchprofound, of honour.The story is narrated by Alexias and tells of his growth into manhood in Athens during the Peloponnesian Wars As a boy he meets Sokrates Renault s preferred spelling whose disciple he later becomes, grows up with Plato and Xenophon and, together with his lover, Lysis, serves under Alkibiades Through the novel we learn about the ins and outs of the wars, but,importantly, we learn about the lives and beliefs of the Athenians Speaking through her narrator, Renault enters deep into their world view, taking for granted, as her narrator does, their spiritual beliefs, their lore and their laws From the very first chapter we are thrust into a world totally foreign to our own, but portrayed entirely on its own terms Alexias is born, small and puny, during a disastrous plague His father, known as Myron the Beautiful, is on the verge of exposing him when he learns that his younger brother has died Alexias uncle, on hearing that the boy he was in love with was ill, has gone to him, and seeing that the boy was dying, has taken hemlock so that they can make the journey together Myron is distressed that he is not able to retrieve their bodies so as to bury them together On returning home he sees that his wife has taken to the baby and does not have the heart to take it from her.A whole world is displayed in this story a father s right to condemn a child to death, his relationship with a wife he considers as littlethan a child, an acceptance, nay a celebration, of love between men, and in particular an older man for a younger, and the narrator s respect for his father despite knowing that his father does not value him.Renault was often criticised for her portrayal of women in her Greek novels, but she is only showing their actual position in Athenian society Women are bound to the house and the household Their honour resides in remaining invisible and nameless Indeed, it is considered disrespectful of a woman even to talk about her If a woman is seen in public, she is either a slave or a courtesan Men in their thirties marry teenage girls, girls that they think of as children, and that they expect to train as their ideal housekeeper It is no wonder that in such a world, men would look to other men for their emotional and sexual relationships It is such an accepted and normalised part of life that Alexias pities his friend Xenophon because he seems incapable of loving a man But these relationships are heavily circumscribed Boys are expected to be courted by older suitors from an early age, but their honour resides in choosing a friend who is honourable and will be a fitting mentor, for this relationship is meant to prepare the boy for manhood The beautiful, thoughtful and brave Lysis is just such an ideal suitor.However, their sexual relationship is portrayed in coy, elliptical terms, reflecting, I assume, the narrator s reticence on these matters, or is it Renault s own reticence After all she was writing in the 1950s , that verge on the frustrating I was also interested to note that although Alexias and Lysis become friends when Alexias is sixteen, they do not become lovers until he is eighteen According to Alexias, this restraint is due to Sokrates influence, but I wonder how much it was due to Renault s own twentieth century sensibilities.Yet, at the same time, I cannot remember being so frustrated when I first read this so many years ago Perhaps to a sheltered girl, these hints were enough, for I have a clear memory of the moment they become lovers And as a romantic teenager, I probably saw that preliminary time of passion and restraint as an expected prelude to a sexual relationship What is it saying about me, my age and my times that, on this reading, I kept wondering what was taking them so long But this story is not only about sexual politics Mary Renault was writing in a time of political turmoil and this is reflected in The Last of the Wine The Athens Alexias is born into is a city of high ideals a city of beauty, honour, the search for truth and democracy But through the course of the war, all of these ideals are slowly lost or corrupted Respect for the law and the person are eroded The democracy Alexias values is undermined and overturned The victorious Spartans establish an oligarchic government which turns into a ruthless tyranny Alexias feels this decay deeply as his own honour is bound up in his city Disillusioned, he and Lysis leave Athens to join a rebellion against its rulers The oligarchy is defeated, but the democracy that replaces it sadly promises to become a tyranny of the banal The novel ends with a foreshadowing of Sokrates fate.The Last of the Wine was Mary Renault s first novel of Ancient Greece and it established her as one of the greatest historical novelists of all time Her empathy for the times and people she portrays, her poetic use of language and her vision can only be emulated by other writers, but, I fear, rarely equalled


  2. Xia Xia Xia Xia says:

    Later edit 29th of Oct, 2018 I said in my review there is no sex in this book, but I have to scratch that After a 24 hours debate literally with Teal and Moony we got to the conclusion this book contains one of the greatest sex scenes ever written in history, you just have to look beyond the symbolism A Masters thesis could be written from the sentence analysis we did, lol Thanks to Teal for opening our eyes to see it I saw death come for you, and I had no philosophy If you came for an Later edit 29th of Oct, 2018 I said in my review there is no sex in this book, but I have to scratch that After a 24 hours debate literally with Teal and Moony we got to the conclusion this book contains one of the greatest sex scenes ever written in history, you just have to look beyond the symbolism A Masters thesis could be written from the sentence analysis we did, lol Thanks to Teal for opening our eyes to see it I saw death come for you, and I had no philosophy If you came for an easy read, I bid you to find some other book This book will rip your heart apart from the first paragraph, and will continue its sweet, beautiful torture till the end It will leave an emptiness inside you and a longing for something I still cannot put my finger on what it is I can t remember ever reading a book where grief and death were such a big part of it At times I couldn t bear it any and had to take a break from reading When I was a young boy, if I was sick or in trouble, or had been beaten at school, I used to remember that on the day I was born my father had wanted to kill me We see everything through the eyes of Alexias, a man who as a boy would have been killed by his father for being born too early and too small, if not for his mother view spoiler We see him fight under the famous Alkibiades, befriend historical figures like Socrates, Plato, Phedon and Xenophon, almost lose his life in one of the harshest historical defeaths the Athenians have ever endured during the Peloponnesian wars, and suffer under the siege the Spartans lay to Athens in the year before Athens became a vassal state to Sparta We see him grow into a man and fall in love with Lysis hide spoiler Everything is change and you cannot step twice into the same river We see him take hard decisions that we can t even comprehend today view spoiler Go in peace, I said to him bear no ill will to me, for Necessity yields to no man and do not complain of me to our mother, for her blood is on your head as well as mine If the gods had not forbidden it, my brother, I would put you to sleep before I left you, for night comes on this is an empty place, and the clouds look dark upon the mountains But the blood of kindred is not to be washed away and when a man has once felt the breath of the Honoured Ones upon his neck, he will not bid them across the threshold So forgive me, and suffer what must be The clouds are heavy if the gods love you, before morning there will be snow hide spoiler As the gods hear me, Alexias, your good shall be mine, and your honor shall be like my own to me and I will stand to it with my life If you are a lover of Ancient Greece, philosophy, Olympic games, mythology and the Peloponnesian War, if you are a lover of classic literature so well written and documented it gives you the impression the author was an immortal who had lived in that era, if you are a lover of complex characters, honor, and love of the good and beautiful , then read this book asap, if you haven t already done so Don t read it if you are interested only in M M love, or hot sex there is none because the focus is far beyond that and you will be disappointed And if I see any reviews with I m dropping this because there is no sex I m gonna be very heartbroken.This book has easily entered my top 10 favorite books, right between Henryk Sienkiewicz Trilogy Qvo Vadis , Madeline Miller s Song of Achilles and Eiji Yoshikawa s Musashi For me, this was better than Qvo Vadis , Song of Achilles and Musashi Nothing still beats the Trilogy though It is said, If Fate were moved by tears, men would offer gold to buy them


  3. Terry Terry says:

    Renault once again does a stellar job bringing Classical Greece to life with the story of Alexias, scion of a minor patrician family in Athens during the era when the city felt turmoil both from within and from without as they experienced not only the aggression of Sparta during Peloponnesian War, but also the existence of philosopher and iconoclast Sokrates At its core this is a tale about love, primarily the love of Alexias for his best friend and lover Lysis though it is also about the diff Renault once again does a stellar job bringing Classical Greece to life with the story of Alexias, scion of a minor patrician family in Athens during the era when the city felt turmoil both from within and from without as they experienced not only the aggression of Sparta during Peloponnesian War, but also the existence of philosopher and iconoclast Sokrates At its core this is a tale about love, primarily the love of Alexias for his best friend and lover Lysis though it is also about the different kind of love Alexias has for his step mother, one of the greatest nurturing elements of his life the muchcomplicated love he has for his father, a hard man of unbending principle and finally the love he has for the truth as learned from the peripatetic sage and gadfly buzzing in the faces of Athens elite, Sokrates The story is pretty straightforward and documents Alexias growth from a child who was nearly left to die of exposure after birth to a young man of some fame, noted for both his beauty and integrity He experiences the hardship and rigors of war along with its occasions for camaraderie and glory , feels the exultation of competing in the great athletic events of the day, and learns to question the s blindly passed onto him by the earlier generation in favour of aclear headed examination of truth not solely based on traditionally held assumptions.The novel is chock full of famous figures of the era Alkibiades the statesman, turncoat, warrior, and all around golden boy loved by both Perikles and Sokrates the afore mentioned Sokrates seen at the height of his malign influence on the youth of Athens Plato and Xenophon, two of Sokrates most famous pupils, not to mention many others perhaps only famous through their inclusion in Platonic dialogues The use of famous historical figures can be a bit of a pitfall for authors of historical fiction as they have to either start inventing them out of whole cloth, or pick and choose which version of the individual to present I think Renault had a much better time of it in this book than she perhaps did in the Alexander books there I think she may have been a bit starry eyed and created an Alexander who, while eminently interesting, could pretty much do no wrong She obviously has a deep affection for Sokrates and his circle, but I felt she managed to avoid some of the pitfalls of hero worship that she fell into with Alexander.Renault tackles many issues in this story the many modes and types of love the place of tradition vs investigation of the new the benefits and pitfalls of both the rule of the many and the rule of the few the struggle between personal desire and communal responsibility, all expressed through the actions and decisions of Alexias as he grows from a boy into a man Alexias is an interesting figure someone from a noble patrician family who is still committed to the best of the democratic ideals, a follower of Sokrates who still values many of the Athenian traditions his mentor questions He is a man who comes to realize what it is he fights for when he fights for his city, whether his enemies be the Spartans, their Vichy like patrician puppets, or even the democratic demagogues that finally win power and I think his vision provides an adroit epigraph for the book Must we forsake the love of excellence, then, till every citizen feels it alike I did not fight, Anytos, to be crowned where I have not run but for a City where I can know who my equals really are, and my betters, to do them honour where a man s daily life is his own business and where no one will force a lie on me because it is expedient, or some other man s will.I love visiting ancient Greece with Renault and am sad to see that only two books remain to me in her oeuvre as new experiences Ah well, that is what re reading is for, right


  4. Sh3lly Sh3lly says:

    1.99 again on US Kindle January 30, 2019 1.99 on US Kindle October 23, 2018https www. Last Wine Nove 1.99 again on US Kindle January 30, 2019 1.99 on US Kindle October 23, 2018https www. Last Wine Nove


  5. Cristina Cristina says:

    There are so many things that could be said about Mary Renault sThe Last of the Wineand I don t want to turn this review into an essay I ll try therefore to keep it short and personal.The first wonderful paragraph of the novelWhen I was a young boy, if I was sick or in trouble, or had been beaten at school, I used to remember that on the day I was born my father had wanted to kill mesets the tone for the narration and for the book s main character, Alexias, a young Athenian living in There are so many things that could be said about Mary Renault sThe Last of the Wineand I don t want to turn this review into an essay I ll try therefore to keep it short and personal.The first wonderful paragraph of the novelWhen I was a young boy, if I was sick or in trouble, or had been beaten at school, I used to remember that on the day I was born my father had wanted to kill mesets the tone for the narration and for the book s main character, Alexias, a young Athenian living in the 5th century B.C and witnessing the political, philosophical and cultural changes of the era.Alexias navigates his life with a sense of curiosity and open wonderment He finds himself attracted to the thoughts of Socrates and through his circle of students, Alexias gets to know many interesting personalities that will contribute to and shape his growing up The most important of these personalities is Lysis, a slightly older man with whom Alexias will form a very strong relationship made of loyalty, trust, mutual love and respect I think this quotation says it allI felt Lysis look at me, and turned towards him Understanding each other, we got up and walked out through the gardens into the streets We did not speak, having no need of it, but made for the High City, and climbed the stairway side by side Leaning on the northern wall we looked out to the mountains On the tops of Parnes the first snow had fallen the day was bright and blue, with a few small clouds, white and violet dark The wind from the north blew our hair from our brows, and streamed our garments behind us The air was clear, keen, and filled with light It seemed to us that at our command the wind would have lifted us like eagles, that our home was the sky We joined our hands they were cold, so that in clasping them we felt the bone within the flesh Still we had not spoken or not with words Turning from the wall we saw people offering at the altars or going in and out of the temples it had seemed to us that the place was empty, but for ourselves When we came to the great altar of Athene I stopped and said, Shall we swear it He thought for a moment and answered, No When a man needs an oath, he has repented that he swore it, and is compelled by fear This must come from our own souls, and from love The relationship between Alexias and Lysis is treated by Renault in an incredible manner It s tender and passionate even though there are no explicit love scenes in the book, the physical bond between them is really powerful and clear Their support for each other through wars, political upheavals, sieges and personal tragedies constitutes the strong backbone of the novel and it s on that that Renault inserts her wonderful reconstruction of ancient Greece and of the Athens of the 5th century B.C that come across as vivid and completely alive.The relationship between Alexias and his two fathers his biological one, Myron, and his philosophical one, Socrates is another aspect of the novel that I really loved Alexias father often seems aloof and cruel but there are unexpected moments of tenderness between him and his son and the way Alexias grows into his own and learns to deal with his father s difficult personality is another beautiful recurrent element in the book.It s very often said that Mary Renault invented Ancient Greece in fiction and I think it d be impossible to argue the contrary The vividness of all the characters, from the invented ones to the historical ones, is astonishing and the writing style complex and rich is a thing of beauty.Very highly recommended


  6. Oz Barton Oz Barton says:

    Short review This is one of the best books I ve ever had the privilege of reading.Long review I put off finishing this book for a long time years but only because I love the characters so deeply, and based on the book s sad opening, I was afraid of a sad ending Normally this wouldn t cause me to hesitate, as I like sad endings, but in this case, I was so incredibly attached to the characters, I couldn t bear the thought of it.And the characters are, for me, the absolute heart of this book Short review This is one of the best books I ve ever had the privilege of reading.Long review I put off finishing this book for a long time years but only because I love the characters so deeply, and based on the book s sad opening, I was afraid of a sad ending Normally this wouldn t cause me to hesitate, as I like sad endings, but in this case, I was so incredibly attached to the characters, I couldn t bear the thought of it.And the characters are, for me, the absolute heart of this book I love them in a way I rarely come to love fictional or fictionalized characters Alexias and Lysis, each fascinating and inspiring individually, are adorable together, the sort of couple that makes me hopeful about relationships in general Their dedication to constantly pursuing a higher standard of behavior makes me want to be a better person myself And of course, I now have a nagging fascination with Xenophon, Socrates, etc.My only complaint about Wine is how much of the story is about the war, with all the politics and battles and state level dramas When I m in the mood for that sort of thing, Renault is fantastic at it but when I just want to know what s going on with Lysis and Alexias, the latest exploits of Alkibiades are less than satisfying.There are a great many tragic moments in this book, many of which are not stated directly but are left for the reader to apprehend for him or herself I loved this, because it made me almost a participant in the story.The language is thick and not easy or fast to read, but while I often found it challenging, there was never a sentence that wasn t worth deciphering, in the end Frankly, the language is beautiful and extraordinarily poetic I can see how the forcefully slowed pace could be annoying, but as I said, I was in no hurry to finish for another reason, and the language s intricacy gave me something to savor.Another criticism I ve seen of this book is the deluge of references to ancient Greek culture and historical events Personally, these barriers were not a great hindrance to the story itself for me Maybe I had just barely enough background knowledge that it wasn t an issue for me I don t know But it s given me not only a lengthy list of people, places, events, and cultural trivia to look up and study indepth it s given me a reason to care about these things This book is the reason I m taking the time to learnabout Socrates, Sparta, the Peloponnesian War which I still know almost nothing about , the Persian Empire, and the economics of ancient Athens It s the reason I m now re reading Homer and Aristophanes and, yes, enjoying a fresh, lively new perspective on them.And when I ve doneresearch on these topics, I look forward to re reading Wine and getting a new perspective on that, too


  7. Siria Siria says:

    The Last of the Wine, although set in the ancient Greek world, like the Fire from Heaven trilogy, it s a very different work Even though the three works of the trilogy have some fabulous characters, and some fabulous character development, the action and the spectacle of Alexander s life is just as much as big a part of the book The Last of the Wine is very different Although it takes place in Greece in the fifth century BC, the time of the great upheaval caused by the Peloponnesian Wars, and The Last of the Wine, although set in the ancient Greek world, like the Fire from Heaven trilogy, it s a very different work Even though the three works of the trilogy have some fabulous characters, and some fabulous character development, the action and the spectacle of Alexander s life is just as much as big a part of the book The Last of the Wine is very different Although it takes place in Greece in the fifth century BC, the time of the great upheaval caused by the Peloponnesian Wars, and though the main character, Alexias, takes part in this conflict, it s a muchsubdued and sober book than the trilogy.Renault concentrates muchon using her main characters Alexias, Lysis, Sokrates, Plato, Myron, Kritias and others to conjure up an image and a feel of what the city of Athens might have been like at the time It s less a history of the state, anda snapshot of the culture and philosophy and thoughts of the time, as transmitted and reflected through these characters It works fabulously well, especially when backed up by Renault s meticulous scholarship Both the substance and the style of this novel make this one to look out for


  8. Ozymandias Ozymandias says:

    I went through a few phases with this book At first I was drawn in and hanging on every word Her recreation of Classical Athens is outstanding and you really do feel like you re walking the ancient streets and listening to real Greeks But after a while of this everything started to feel rather like we ve already seen it all The plot takes a long while to go anywhere and we spend most of our time wandering the city, listening to Socrates, and practicing for war The warlike material itself is I went through a few phases with this book At first I was drawn in and hanging on every word Her recreation of Classical Athens is outstanding and you really do feel like you re walking the ancient streets and listening to real Greeks But after a while of this everything started to feel rather like we ve already seen it all The plot takes a long while to go anywhere and we spend most of our time wandering the city, listening to Socrates, and practicing for war The warlike material itself is probably the least interesting part of the book But then, after I d gotten tired of it all, the book staged a miraculous comeback with a marvelous depiction of the final stage of the Peloponnesian War culminating with the overthrow of the Thirty Tyrants.I suppose what I m saying is that the book needs pruning At over 600 pages and this despite space saving measures like clustering all the dialogue into single paragraphs even the greatest of elements can wear out its welcome This was Renault s first Greek book and it does, unfortunately, show Her later books frequently suffer from the same bloat, but manage to contain it better.And yet, somehow, the book feels near flawless When it works itWORKS , when it doesn t work you just wish it would start working again.This book is about many things It s about Classical Athens obviously, and the Peloponnesian War specifically It s about the cultural and philosophical life of Greece It s about homosexuality specifically the idealized Greek pederastic kind But mainly I feel it s about philosophy and the love of excellence that so defined the Greek mind.Socrates and his circle are right at the center of this book s soul and it does not disappoint Socrates is one of those rare people whose personality is immediately identifiable Alcibiades has dozens of conflicting interpretations Every take I ve seen on Socrates, from Plato to The Road to Sardis to Assassin s Creed Odyssey all feel like the same man Of course, there are different degrees of success Renault really captures something of his brilliant mind His philosophical musings come very close to the way Plato described them And the way he good hudly interrogates everyone for answers, undermining the unexamined assumptions, even when this pisses people off is so very Socrates And the best part about him is that, while he doesn t really grow as a character, the final stages of the novel give him the chance to really put his philosophy into action and take a firm and lonely stand against the worst of tyrannies It s fair to say I don t think he s been shown better.Alexias doesn t interest me much as a character Like a lot of 50s historical fiction protagonists he s mostly there to be a paragon of virtue amid troubled times The only time I recall him ever doing something wrong is during the excellent description of the trial of the generals He gets carried away with passion for understandable reasons and only afterwards realizes the horrible mistake that was made Other than that he s fairly milquetoast, and the same can be said for his lover Lysis.The reason this doesn t matter is that both characters are only there as a conduit for various ideas As a couple they are an exploration of Greek love, particularly the educational and virtuous striving for excellence that was such a key component As individuals they represent elite Athenian intellectuals and the philosophical cultural beliefs of the society While this could bother me were this novel less well written and perhaps it helps explain why the middle section could be so dragging I never had a problem with it here Two excellent people searching for greater excellence is such a uniquely Greek thing I have to approve.Mary Renault s books are probably the closest we will ever come to experiencing the wonder of Classical Greece in its heyday When I read her books I can feel the stones of Ancient Athens beneath my feet You can feel the excitement of new ideas and the patterns of traditional thought Only wandering the ruins of the Acropolis can bring you closer This book is the best recreation of Ancient Athens I ve ever read There arestories I want to see told,aspects of ancient life I d like to see recreated, but for the story it tells and it covers a lot it will be hard to better this.Plot 10 Slow in middle, but always strong Characters 10 Every one distinctive, especially Socrates Accuracy 10 Only minor objections on matters of interpretation


  9. Leon March Leon March says:

    From the first sentence this novel has easily become my favourite I made it a tradition to read it each year and have done so now for the 15th time Some may call it obsessive, but I have to say that each time I read it I found something new in it that made me reflect on life in a different way You can not read a book and expect it to change your life, it will change your life at precisely the moment you need it The Last of the Wine has done that for me over and over again.First of all it i From the first sentence this novel has easily become my favourite I made it a tradition to read it each year and have done so now for the 15th time Some may call it obsessive, but I have to say that each time I read it I found something new in it that made me reflect on life in a different way You can not read a book and expect it to change your life, it will change your life at precisely the moment you need it The Last of the Wine has done that for me over and over again.First of all it is my desire to impress on potential readers that you don t have to be gay to like the story From my perspective it has never been a gay book even though some would like to force it into this category, but it is a book about an ancient culture when relationships between men were approved by society, when in theory it was meant to be about muchthan just love and desire The main characters would never consider themselves gay as we define the term today, it is a completely different concept The book is about society, seen from the point of view of a young man who from his first breath didn t seem to fit in, being ugly, weak and unappreciated by his kin A boy, who is humble, modest and compassionate The story tells us how he is being tossed into the fire and bent to become a decent Hellene handsome, successful, brave and sometimes even cruel.It leads us to understand how all our good intentions may be cast aside with the change of circumstances, how we as humans may think ourselves better and then do unto others what has been done to us Honour is a big issue in the novel, because it was a big issue in those days, the honour of an upright citizen of Athens Is honour what others think of us Will it be lost if an insult is not avenged Or is it simply the consequence of what we do or neglect to do We follow very well pictured characters, many of them based on historical figures, through their struggle with a complex society, a net of political intrigues, a war that in the end will shatter faith in human reason.For all those who do not think pink it will be quite a revelation to see in print, from adistant perspective than their own, why Democracy can be just as dangerous and unjust as a Tyranny It is depressing, intoxicating, intriguing and at times even hilarious.Personally, I felt every moment of it


  10. Mel Bossa Mel Bossa says:

    Splendid Full of wisdom and grace The ending was worth the whole book I loved Phaedo the most


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