The Diary of Mademoiselle D'Arvers PDF/EPUB Ö Diary



10 thoughts on “The Diary of Mademoiselle D'Arvers

  1. Roselyn Roselyn says:

    Rating 2.75 5


  2. P P says:

    The most interesting part of the novel is not in the novel at all It s a fragment of a letter included in the Introduction where Toru Dutt writes to a friend, We do not go much into society now The Bengali reunions are always for men Wives and daughters and all women kind are confined to the house, under lock and key, a la lettre, and Europeans are generally supercilious and look down on Bengalis I have not been to one dinner party or any party at all since we left Europe And then I do not The most interesting part of the novel is not in the novel at all It s a fragment of a letter included in the Introduction where Toru Dutt writes to a friend, We do not go much into society now The Bengali reunions are always for men Wives and daughters and all women kind are confined to the house, under lock and key, a la lettre, and Europeans are generally supercilious and look down on Bengalis I have not been to one dinner party or any party at all since we left Europe And then I do not know any people here except our kith and kin, and some of them I do not know xvi This fragment provides us with the backdrop to the inane fantasy of Marguerite D Arvers There are no characters of color instead Dutt seeks to escape into the skin of the people who avoid her company Let us pause for a moment and reflect on the violence of such self erasure Here is a young imagination, internally colonized, loathing its racial identity and wishing to inhabit European ideals of beauty and culture If we want to know how Bengali women were inculcated with such colonial ideas, we can find no better example than the crudity of this childish author who has not yet learned to cloak her desires in ambiguous language Against the stifling homosociality of the Bengali expatriate community where she was relegated to the status of a worthless unmarried female, Dutt wove a tale of a French girl who is treated with exaggerated courtesy by every person she encounters in the novel space While Toru Dutt was too brown for the life she wanted to lead, her fictional alter ego is described as pale and the anxiety to perform paleness registers on the reader because nearly every character towards the latter half of the novel repeats, Marguerite, you are looking so pale Dutt s vanity was fulfilled by forcing each character to laud Marguerite s great beauty and goodness, over and over again as an obsessive refrain Other young women are kept firmly in the background and older women are allowed to enter into the novel scape only if they, too, partner the men in heaping praise on Dutt s alter ego In fact, Marguerite has very little personality aside from being beautiful passively and good in a limp emulation of supposed Christian virtue Bengali racism and colorism inflect descriptions of male characters For instance, Marguerite slobbers over a count whose skin is so white, we are informed, that she can see his blue veins starkly outlined Unpublished in the author s lifetime, Diary of Mme D Arvers was misfiled under the name of the French woman, Clarisse Bader, who wrote one of the introductions Bader s patronizing introduction foregrounds the colonial rationale for such a mistake The novelty of a brown Indian girl writing an entire novel in French, Bader seems to suggest, is a novelty akin to a monkey writing a Bible verse What if Toru Dutt had written a different novel One that was less of a self coddling fantasy Lonely and far from the company of friends, Dutt found escape into the character of the favored Marguerite But I can t help imagining a novel which would have boldly reflected French society in its exclusions not from the vantage point of one donning whiteface but anchored in her own, unacceptably brown and irrevocably female desiring subject body


  3. Elizabeth Elizabeth says:

    This book isexciting when I think about it as a pseudo Gothic novel castle with mysterious chambers, innocent maiden, family madness Unfortunately, the Gothic elements are few and kinda far between The author, Dutt, is pretty fascinating, though, so that knowledge helped augment the reading.


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The Diary of Mademoiselle D'Arvers ❰Read❯ ➫ The Diary of Mademoiselle D'Arvers Author Toru Dutt – Natus-physiotherapy.co.uk Set in France in the second half of the nineteenth century, The Diary of Mademoiselle D Arvers is a novel of possibilities and limitations of love, marriage and domesticity, and the heartaches and joy Set in France of Mademoiselle PDF ☆ in the second half of the nineteenth century, The Diary of Mademoiselle D Arvers is a novel of possibilities and limitations of love, marriage and domesticity, and the heartaches and joys of growing up Fifteen year old Marguerite, fresh from her convent education and The Diary Kindle - extremely religious, returns to her family and experiences the first stirrings of love, only to find herself entangled in a complicated net of relationships The story traces Marguerite s growth through adolescence to maturity and marital happiness Written in secret and discovered by the author s father after Diary of Mademoiselle eBook ´ her death, this poignant novel is a unique and unexpected outcome of the intellectual, linguistic, and cultural ferment of nineteenth century colonial Bengal.