Willing Slaves: How the Overwork Culture Is Ruling Our


    Willing Slaves: How the Overwork Culture Is Ruling Our revolution What do we get in return for this hard work Stagnant wages, job insecurity, stress, exhaustion the British workforce has not been so powerless for over a century Willing Slaves exposes the paradox that, though we re all being exploited, it s work that has come to give our lives meaning religion, political causes, family life have become secondary."/>
  • Paperback
  • 325 pages
  • Willing Slaves: How the Overwork Culture Is Ruling Our Lives
  • Madeleine Bunting
  • English
  • 13 May 2019
  • 000716372X

10 thoughts on “Willing Slaves: How the Overwork Culture Is Ruling Our Lives

  1. Rosie Rosie says:

    It is through work that we seek to satisfy our craving for a sense of control, of mastery, of security and autonomy in a chaotic, insecure world this is the gold at the end of the rainbow The craving is never satisfied, we are always promisedif we work that bit harder It s telling that, over a decade after this book was published, most of what it includes remains as relevant as ever Madeline Bunting sets out to understand why Britain is a nation of workaholics compared to our EuropeIt is through work that we seek to satisfy our craving for a sense of control, of mastery, of security and autonomy in a chaotic, insecure world this is the gold at the end of the rainbow The craving is never satisfied, we are always promisedif we work that bit harder It s telling that, over a decade after this book was published, most of what it includes remains as relevant as ever Madeline Bunting sets out to understand why Britain is a nation of workaholics compared to our European neighbours who tend to view excessive work as a sign of inefficiency, not dedication despite an enduring lack of social mobility see above , job stability, adequate benefits and so on She talks to a range of people in different careers about their perspective on overwork culture and to a few who have managed to opt out


  2. Ietrio Ietrio says:

    A hysteric cry for mediocrity, stupidity and whomever might like to ally Nothing wrong with that, only the only means of perpetuating such a system is robbery and leeching off the productive just creates a slave group, which the author seems to be vaguely against In fact, Madeleine Bunting is not against, Madeleine Bunting is for slavery, only not us , but them.


  3. Simon Copland Simon Copland says:

    In this book Madeleine Bunting takes and in depth look at the overwork culture that is dominating the United Kingdom although the messages and evidence are relevant throughout the world Bunting explores this issue in depth, discussing how the past decades have seen the development of an overwork culture, looking at the extremely negative impacts of that culture from increased stress and mental health problems to less time to care for those we love and then looks at the solutions to the is In this book Madeleine Bunting takes and in depth look at the overwork culture that is dominating the United Kingdom although the messages and evidence are relevant throughout the world Bunting explores this issue in depth, discussing how the past decades have seen the development of an overwork culture, looking at the extremely negative impacts of that culture from increased stress and mental health problems to less time to care for those we love and then looks at the solutions to the issues In doing so Bunting sets up an impressive argument It is well researched, exquisitely argued and extremely relevant to a range of political issues we face around the world today The only critique I have of Bunting s work is that sometimes she can be too thorough At times the points are a bit laboured as she uses numerous examples and statistics to make the same point Whilst the book is extremely easy to read therefore, this can make it drag on a little Some finer editing would have been useful This criticism aside however and this book is definitely worth a read


  4. Nick Davies Nick Davies says:

    A very interesting book about the working culture in the UK, which was quite an eye opener It was packed full of enlightening stats i.e that fewer women are in work ten years after the birth of a child, then are a year after somewhat reflecting a need to go back to work straight away, and then how being back at work puts a strain on things There was also discussions I can sympathise with in that due to the influence of IT and the greater importance of auditing, it now means that people eac A very interesting book about the working culture in the UK, which was quite an eye opener It was packed full of enlightening stats i.e that fewer women are in work ten years after the birth of a child, then are a year after somewhat reflecting a need to go back to work straight away, and then how being back at work puts a strain on things There was also discussions I can sympathise with in that due to the influence of IT and the greater importance of auditing, it now means that people each have TWO jobs to do they have to do their job, and then they have to prove that they ve done their job Alas as interesting and shocking as it was, I can t really claim that it had a positive impact or helped me regain my work life balance


  5. Catherine Catherine says:

    Not sure why I picked this up from the table at the Unconvention when I have already done the opting out it suggests, at least to a certain extent It explores the overwork culture which it claims is a product of the last thirty years or so and lays at the door of companies out for profit There are lots of examples and descriptions of lifestyles and jobs that have become evenprevalent in the nearly ten years since it was written and were again in the news at the time I was slowly readin Not sure why I picked this up from the table at the Unconvention when I have already done the opting out it suggests, at least to a certain extent It explores the overwork culture which it claims is a product of the last thirty years or so and lays at the door of companies out for profit There are lots of examples and descriptions of lifestyles and jobs that have become evenprevalent in the nearly ten years since it was written and were again in the news at the time I was slowly reading it Maybe it is because it is no longer new that I thought it was over simplistic and repetitive and didn t enjoy reading it


  6. Pete Pete says:

    Good critique on society s obsession with working long hours and making career the centrepiece of one s existence Some very good points made about the detrimental effect on mental health, family life, friendships, etc and how many workplaces try to replace these in order to become the focus of individuals lives Very interesting for those with workaholic tendencies who might want to consider what they re burying for their career, and slackers like myself who can get their smug on.


  7. Nicki Nicki says:

    I found this personally very relevant to my life While it doesn t offer many solutions, it is thought provoking and has encouraged me to value my free time and not to get sucked into the quantity of work beingvaluable than quality I have been guilty of this in the past To do a job well, need to be healthy and not neglecting my health.


  8. Gsc Gsc says:

    Torn with this one.Well written, interesting topic, plenty of references to back up points But too too long Much better as a longer article found myself skipping pages as the points were being repeated.


  9. Farhat Baig Farhat Baig says:

    why the british work the longest hours in europe but the economy is still behind the big european economies also, the stresses involved with the long hours, competitive nature of the work place and culture and how to achieve a balance between one s work and social life.


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Willing Slaves: How the Overwork Culture Is Ruling Our Lives[KINDLE] ❂ Willing Slaves: How the Overwork Culture Is Ruling Our Lives Author Madeleine Bunting – Natus-physiotherapy.co.uk A hardhitting expose of the overwork culture and modern management techniques that seduce millions of people to hand over the best part of their lives to their employer Work has come to increasingly d A hardhitting expose of the overwork How the PDF/EPUB ê culture and modern management techniques that seduce millions of people to hand over the best part of their Willing Slaves: eBook Í lives to their employer Work has come to increasingly dominate British national life Job intensification affects every shopfloor, office, classroom and hospital, as a cult Slaves: How the PDF/EPUB ë of efficiency has driven a missionary magnetism of tighter deadlines and exacting targets in the most exploitative and manipulative work culture developed since the industrial revolution What do we get in return for this hard work Stagnant wages, job insecurity, stress, exhaustion the British workforce has not been so powerless for over a century Willing Slaves exposes the paradox that, though we re all being exploited, it s work that has come to give our lives meaning religion, political causes, family life have become secondary.


About the Author: Madeleine Bunting

Madeleine was born in North Yorkshire, How the PDF/EPUB ê one of five children of artist parents She studied history at Corpus Christi, Cambridge and Harvard, US She Willing Slaves: eBook Í held a number positions at the Guardian including reporter, leader writer, religious affairs editor, and for twelve years, she was a columnist She wrote about Slaves: How the PDF/EPUB ë a wide range of subjects including Islam, faith, global development, politics and social change She directed the Guardian s first ever festival, Open Weekend, in From , she led a team as Editorial Director of Strategy, working on a project around reimagining the institution of a newspaper and its relationship with readers She has a longstanding interest in contemplative practices and in she co founded The Mindfulness Initiative to explore the potential of mindfulness in public policy particularly health and education The Initiative supported the All Party Parliamentary Group in their month inquiry which led to a report Mindful Nation UK, published in October She lives in East London with her family She has received a number of awards and prizes including an honorary fellowship from Cardiff University in , the Portico Prize for The Plot in , a Lambeth MA degree in , The Race in the Media award in and the Imam wa Amal Special Award in She has won several One World Media awards for her journalism on global justice.